• Computational Grid Portals & Networks (Tuesday 1:30-3:00PM)
    Room A108/110/112
    Chair: David Abramson, Monash University, AU

    • Title: The XCAT Science Portal
    • Authors:
      Sriram Krishnan (Department of Computer Science, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN)
      Randall Bramley (Department of Computer Science, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN)
      Dennis Gannon (Department of Computer Science, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN)
      Madhusudhan Govindaraju (Department of Computer Science, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN)
      Rahul Indurkar (Department of Computer Science, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN)
      Aleksander Slominski (Department of Computer Science, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN)
      Benjamin Temko (Department of Computer Science, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN)
      Jay Alameda (National Computational Science Alliance)
      Richard Alkire (Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL)
      Timothy Drews (Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL)
      Eric Webb (Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL)
      Best Student Paper Finalist
    • Abstract:
      The design and prototype implementation of the XCAT Grid Science Portal is described in this paper. The portal lets grid application programmers easily script complex distributed computations and package these applications with simple interfaces for others to use. Each application is packaged as a "notebook" which consists of web pages and editable parameterized scripts. The portal is a workstation-based specialized "personal" web server, capable of executing the application scripts and launching remote grid applications for the user. The portal server can receive event streams published by the application and grid resource information published by Network Weather Service (NWS) or Autopilot sensors. Notebooks can be "published" and stored in web based archives for others to retrieve and modify. The XCAT Grid Science Portal has been tested with various applications, including the distributed simulation of chemical processes in semiconductor manufacturing and collaboratory support for X-ray crystallographers.

    • Title: A Jini-based Computing Portal System
    • Authors:
      Toyotaro Suzumura (Tokyo Institute of Technology)
      Satoshi Matsuoka (Tokyo Institute of Technology)
      Hidemoto Nakada (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology/Tokyo Institute of Technology)
    • Abstract:
      JiPANG(A Jini-based Portal Augmenting Grids) is a portal system and a toolkit which provides uniform access interface layer to a variety of Grid systems, and is built on top of Jini distributed object technology. JiPANG performs uniform higher-level management of the computing services and resources being managed by individual Grid systems such as Ninf, NetSolve, Globus, etc. In order to give the user a uniform interface to the Grids JiPANG provides a set of simple Java APIs called the JiPANG Toolkits, and furthermore, allows the user to interact with Grid systems, again in a uniform way, using the JiPANG Browser application. With JiPANG, users need not install any client packages beforehand to interact with Grid systems, nor be concerned about updating to the latest version. Such uniform, transparent services available in a ubiquitous manner we believe is essential for the success of Grid as a viable computing platform for the next generation.

    • Title: Efficient Network and I/O Throttling for Fine-Grain Cycle Stealing
    • Authors:
      Kyung D. Ryu (Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering, Arizona State University)
      Jeffrey K. Hollingsworth (Dept. of Computer Science, University of Maryland)
      Peter J. Keleher (Dept. of Computer Science, University of Maryland)
    • Abstract:
      This paper proposes and evaluates a new mechanism, rate windows, for I/O and network rate policing. The goal of the proposed system is to provide a simple, yet effective way to enforce resource limits on target classes of jobs in a system. This work was motivated by our Linger Longer infrastructure, which harvests idle cycles in networks of workstations. Network and I/O throttling is crucial because Linger Longer can leave guest jobs on non-idle nodes and machine owners should not be adversely affected. Our approach is quite simple. We use a sliding window of recent events to compute the average rate for a target resource. The assigned limit is enforced by the simple expedient of putting application processes to sleep when they issue requests that would bring their resource utilization out of the allowable profile. Our I/O system call intercept model makes the rate windows mechanism light-weight and highly portable. Our experimental results show that we are able to limit resource usage to within a few percent of target usages.